Artificial Intelligence and the Resort to Force

A new project addresses how artificial intelligence might change how states decide to use force against one another.

Source: Artificial Intelligence and the Resort to Force

Advertisements

How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes

“We have seen this rapid rise in deep learning technology and the question is: Is that going to keep going, or is it plateauing? What’s going to happen next?”

Source: How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes

Big Bad Data: Achilles’ Heel of Artificial Intelligence

An adversary who has access to the dataset your AI trained on can figure out what its likely blind spots are, said Brian Sadler, a senior scientist at the Army Research Laboratory: “If I know your data, I can create ways to fake out your system.”

Source: Big Bad Data: Achilles’ Heel of Artificial Intelligence

Top US Intelligence Official Sue Gordon Wants Silicon Valley on Her Side

In an expansive on-the-record interview with WIRED, the principal deputy director of national intelligence made her pitch for public-private partnerships.

And the burn: “One of the key things about Google is I think it’s adorable that they have morals now when they’re using technology that the department built for them. That’s cute,” she says, “But we’ve always done this together.”

Source: Top US Intelligence Official Sue Gordon Wants Silicon Valley on Her Side

Amazon Employees Aren’t Happy With How Execs Just Addressed Concerns Over Cops Using Its Facial Recognition Tech

“It’s hard to trust that harm and abuse can be prevented if it is only post-mortem and through the Terms of Service,” an Amazon employee told BuzzFeed News.

Source: Amazon Employees Aren’t Happy With How Execs Just Addressed Concerns Over Cops Using Its Facial Recognition Tech

Chinese ‘gait recognition’ tech IDs people by how they walk

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese authorities have begun deploying a new surveillance tool: “gait recognition” software that uses people’s body shapes and how they walk to identify them, even when their faces are hidden from cameras. Already used by police on the streets of Beijing and Shanghai, “gait recognition” is part of a push across China to develop artificial-intelligence and data-driven surveillance that is raising concern about how far the technology will go.

Source: Chinese ‘gait recognition’ tech IDs people by how they walk