Emergent Technology, Military Advantage, and the Character of Future War

Absent a clear understanding of which military problems emergent technologies are required to solve, there is, perhaps, too much confidence in their ability to reshape the character of the next war by enabling decisive battlefield advantage. More troublingly, predictions about machine-dominated warfare risk obscuring the human cost implicit in the use of violence to achieve a political objective.

Source: Emergent Technology, Military Advantage, and the Character of Future War

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The NSA and the USA Freedom Act

Data inconsistency or data consistency indigestion!

How to understand the NSA’s June 28 announcement about its call-detail record databases.

Source: The NSA and the USA Freedom Act

Debate rages about whether Spongebob is a sea sponge or a dish sponge

Ignoring the Wikipedia page makes this much more fun and the only unanswered question is why the pineapple is transparent.

He may live in a pineapple under the sea, but just what exactly is Spongebob Squarepants?

“Another Twitter user proffered some useful evidence.”

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Source: Debate rages about whether Spongebob is a sea sponge or a dish sponge

A Solution to the U.S. Military’s Scalability Problem: Software Flexibility

Admiral Yamamoto Isoroku, the architect of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, predicted the pivotal role that industrial overmatch would play in the outcome of World War II. Proving him right, America produced a staggering 300,000 aircraft during the war compared to Japan’s meager 76,000.

Source: A Solution to the U.S. Military’s Scalability Problem: Software Flexibility

John Boyd on Clausewitz: Don’t Fall in Love with Your Mental Model

Boyd sought not so much to circumvent Clausewitz as to use the Prussian’s concepts as fuel in his own mental refinery. And Boyd’s message to his audience was that the process of mental refinement could not stop, nor be confined to the ideas of any one individual, no matter how insightful they might

Source: John Boyd on Clausewitz: Don’t Fall in Love with Your Mental Model

The Psychology of Perceiving Uncertainty

Editor’s Note: This is the fourth installment in “Off Guard,” a series on surprise in war inspired by a new CSIS study. Read the rest of the series here. Saddam Hussein and George W. Bush saw different worlds in early 2003, but shared a common belief: Each was certain that his read of the strategic situation was

Source: The Psychology of Perceiving Uncertainty