A new generation of intelligence collaborative tools is coming

LOL … Reference Architecture. How many readers know what that means?

The intelligence community is entering a second era for its massive IT modernization project designed for better collaboration and integration across its 17 disparate agencies.

Source: A new generation of intelligence collaborative tools is coming

Advertisements

DHS’ Big Data Integration Challenge

“DHS component elements generally do not see value in integrating information across the enterprise.  And there is little incentive to change this paradigm, absent dedicated funding for the enterprise and a clear prioritization of this integration from the Department’s leadership.”

DejaVu. Reminds me of one of my Boeing experiences. Our group transitioned from Data Conversion to a newly minted Enterprise Information and Data Architecture under Enterprise Architecture and Integration. The group’s largest project was the Enterprise Data Warehouse  to integrate data from silos owned by various business units and groups with no budget or incentive for those groups to share that data. Losing control of their fiefdom is also an unspoken concern of managers, and data is control. To make things worse, despite the “top-down” CIO (not CEO) mandate, those managers had to pay for the integration from their own budget … and push their other projects into not-on-schedule and over-budget to accommodate some thing that got them nothing in return. You guessed it, it was “you gotta be fucking kidding me” attitude walking into some meetings.

Technical challenges were surmountable but the organizational ones were not. It is not necessary to go into the detail of how some Architects felt about the ethics of pushing a product they did not believe in down the throat of other groups to their detriment, and I got into a spat with a couple managers almost outright telling them I am not a snake oil salesman. I do not know how that went, the last I know some clown Blue guy choked on it and lost the EDW budget.

As DHS announces major changes aimed at sharing more information with the private sector, The Cipher Brief talks with a former DHS Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis about the department’s big data challenges

Source: DHS’ Big Data Integration Challenge

Emergent Technology, Military Advantage, and the Character of Future War

Absent a clear understanding of which military problems emergent technologies are required to solve, there is, perhaps, too much confidence in their ability to reshape the character of the next war by enabling decisive battlefield advantage. More troublingly, predictions about machine-dominated warfare risk obscuring the human cost implicit in the use of violence to achieve a political objective.

Source: Emergent Technology, Military Advantage, and the Character of Future War

How the Five Eyes Can Harness Commercial Innovation

Here are a few concrete ways to get this alliance’s vibrant commercial technology sectors to address common national-security concerns.

Source: How the Five Eyes Can Harness Commercial Innovation

Nearly All Major Agencies Are on Governmentwide Cyber Threat Dashboard

Nice and it can also have other benefits related to technology life cycle management, procurement, costs reductions, transformation and EA. The system can also be an Achilles heel. But then working with EINSTEIN would make them smarter and they can fight back at the speed of light … go E3A! 

So far, 20 of 23 major agencies are plugged into the dashboard. The last three should be on by the end of July.

Source: Nearly All Major Agencies Are on Governmentwide Cyber Threat Dashboard

What’s Involved in Vetting a Security Protocol: Why Ray Ozzie’s Proposal for Exceptional Access Does Not Pass Muster

Because Susan Landau is a true Architect, Ray Ozzie never was.

Ray Ozzie’s proposal for exceptional access has the virtue of being simple. But security can be subtle, and simple solutions often miss critical aspects. This one has.

Source: What’s Involved in Vetting a Security Protocol: Why Ray Ozzie’s Proposal for Exceptional Access Does Not Pass Muster

Building on Sand Isn’t Stable: Correcting a Misunderstanding of the National Academies Report on Encryption

The National Academies’ report on “Decrypting the Encryption Debate” says some computer-security experts have ideas for implementing secure exceptional access to encrypted systems—but that’s a far cry from saying they’re “trying to build” them.

Source: Building on Sand Isn’t Stable: Correcting a Misunderstanding of the National Academies Report on Encryption