GDPR Derogations, ePrivacy, and the Evolving European Privacy Landscape

GDPR derogations will be applied throughout the EU. A few potential state-to-state variations will have implications for privacy and security.

Source: GDPR Derogations, ePrivacy, and the Evolving European Privacy Landscape

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NSA General Counsel Glenn Gerstell Remarks to Georgetown Cybersecurity Law Institute

On Wednesday, NSA General Counsel Glenn Gerstell delivered the following remarks at the Georgetown Cybersecurity Law Institute in a speech entitled “Failing to Keep Pace: The Cyber Threat and Its Implications for Our Privacy Laws.”

Source: NSA General Counsel Glenn Gerstell Remarks to Georgetown Cybersecurity Law Institute

The FBI’s Gigantic Math Error

Oh what is a double or triple counting error. It is not like they know PhD researchers in Cambridge. May be their database got hacked!

On the serious side, it is a problem with no clear solution.

In an increasingly interconnected digital world, strong cybersecurity is essential to safeguarding private data, financial transactions, personal communications, and critical infrastructure. Encryption is one of the few technologies we have that reliably protects sensitive data from identity thieves, credit card fraud, and other criminal activity.Against this backdrop, high-ranking officials in the FBI and other law enforcement agencies have claimed for years that criminals are using strong encryption to frustrate information gathering in criminal investigations. They have dubbed this the “Going Dark” problem, conjuring a future in which criminals roam free from the reach of law enforcement.

Source: The FBI’s Gigantic Math Error

Memo to POTUS: Responding to Cyber Attacks and PPD-20

The root cause of the cyber dilemma (military, technical, legal) is that it does not lend itself to clear conceptualizations and definitions required by current frameworks that delineate boundaries and restrain or enable responses.

UK attorney general articulated ground rule positions on otherwise contentious issues that suggest some over analyzing and complicating of current debates.

Healey’s article is about Cybercom and it recommends restricted experimentation/baseline (sunset-able authorizations) of military escalation control.

At the core, the issue is not one of authorizations or capabilities but of definitions. It seems setting some ground rules like the UK, even if on a temporary basis, addresses both at a higher baseline. The required agility will be an immediate and coherent result. The advantage of that enabling approach is that it deals with a wild west of pests not by playing and fine-tuning capabilities in a whack-a-mole game but defining, isolating and clearing the ground first or at least concurrently.

Mr. President, as you know the United States has faced cyber attacks of increasing frequency and viciousness from our adversaries. Your NSC is about to bring you both a new cyber strategy and a proposal to modify a previous NSC document called PPD-20 to give US Cyber Command more authority to interfere with these adversary attacks without checking back with you and the NSC as much.

Source: Memo to POTUS: Responding to Cyber Attacks and PPD-20

United Kingdom Att’y General’s Speech on International Law and Cyber: Key Highlights

Eight key takeaways on the United Kingdom’s position on international law and cyberspace, presented at Chatham House on 23 May 2018.

Source: United Kingdom Att’y General’s Speech on International Law and Cyber: Key Highlights

Top-tier banks have been quietly sharing threat information with U.S. Cyber Command

Project Indigo allows a select group of banks from Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center to share threat data with U.S. Cyber Command.

Source: Top-tier banks have been quietly sharing threat information with U.S. Cyber Command

What Did Russian Trolls Want During the 2016 Election? A Closer Look at the Internet Research Agency’s Active Measures

In March, after a more than yearlong investigation into Russian active measures used during the 2016 presidential campaign, the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence released its final report. The report asserted that the primary goal of Russia’s covert influence campaign through social media platforms was

Source: What Did Russian Trolls Want During the 2016 Election? A Closer Look at the Internet Research Agency’s Active Measures

The Top Three Trends We Miss When Discussing Russian Ads

Last week, the Democrats of the House Intelligence Committee released the trove of over 3,500 Facebook ads purchased by the St. Petersburg-based Internet Research Agency (IRA) from 2015 to 2017. For the most part, the release confirms what we already knew: Accounts based in Russia exploited America’s societal fissures to sow chaos in the United States in order to weaken our democratic structures, force us to turn inward, and thereby increase Russia’s standing in the world.

Source: The Top Three Trends We Miss When Discussing Russian Ads